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Posts tagged ‘volunteer’

Super Sunday – Keeping Seniors Connected and Healthy

Super Sunday, it's more than a donation.

Your Gift Helps Seniors
Stay Connected and Healthy

Rising costs, fixed incomes, and lack of mobility are just a few of the challenges faced by Jewish seniors today. That’s why we support agencies that provide vital health services, kosher meals, and direct financial assistance. And by funding transportation, social programs, and senior residential facilities we also help older adults stay healthy, connected, and active. Your gift to the 2013 Annual Campaign makes all this possible.
That’s the power of community.
or
 Answer the call on January 27, 2013

Register to volunteer at Super Sunday

Federation Fellows Brings New Leaders to the Community

Become a leader of the Jewish community.

Building on previous years of similar and successful programs, we’re excited to announce the launch of Federation Fellows, a leadership development program designed to attract, train and educate new and emerging leaders for the Jewish community. Participants’ ages range from 20s – 40s and the program requires a commitment of two years, beginning summer 2012.

Apply Today

So what’s in store for our Federation Fellows?

  • Following an in-depth orientation, participants will be placed as provisional members on the boards of our community’s agencies, organizations, and synagogues in the fall of 2012.
  • During the second year of the program, Fellows will serve as an active committee member at the Federation.
  • Over the course of both years, Fellows will participate in numerous leadership training programs, workshops, and seminars.
  • Once one participates in the program, one is a Federation Fellow for life! A Fellow will continue to benefit from networking,leadership training, and educational opportunities offered by the Federation.

Both the Fellows and the community organizations they served have benefited tremendously from Federation Fellows over the years. Here’s a look at just a few of those who have been motivated, guided, and inspired by the program. 

Rabbi Doug Kahn, Executive Director, Jewish Community Relations Council
JCRC was a true beneficiary of the program – young, committed Jewish adult leaders eager to gain experience in the Jewish communal universe, bringing enthusiasm and commitment and taking away greater understanding of our role in the community. It is a win-win situation – good for our organizations, good for the Federation, and good for the community.

Jeff Maltz (Federation Fellow 2001-2002)
 I was placed on the Board of the Institute of Aging (IOA) as it sought to navigate many issues facing its future. By being on the board, I learned about various strategies used for fundraising, how a board helps guide a CEO on organizational direction, and of course, about aging. I found that experience to be invaluable both professionally in terms of working with boards and non-profits, and in my volunteer life to better understand the challenges nonprofits face. Coincidentally, 10 years later I ended up starting a company in the senior space called SilverRide. My experience on the board of the IOA ended up proving to be very valuable, and actually helped guide my thinking when starting the SilverRide.

Lois Wander (Federation Fellow 1999-2000)
I served as a Fed Fellow at A Traveling Jewish Theatre (now TJT), and then later as a full-fledged board member for several years. I learned a lot from the experience, including the basics from how board meetings are run, to some more impactful work such as fundraising, hiring executive directors, and securing loans. In addition to helping the community, you also learn important management and leadership skills. It was very valuable, and I encourage others to participate in this program.

Apply online today.
Want more information? Read the full description of the Fed Fellows.

The Federation Fellows program has transformed dozens of individuals into exceptional leaders. This innovative program allows Fellows to make positive changes to JCF, the Bay Area Jewish community, and the San Francisco community as a whole For more information on how to participate, please contact Liza Meckler, Leadership Development Associate, at (415) 512-6260 or LizaM@sfjcf.org.


Help a teen win $36,000

Do you know an outstanding teenager in our community who deserves to be recognized?

Nominate a teen today for the Diller Teen Tikkun Olam Awards, which annually honor up to 5 teens who have demonstrated remarkable leadership and are actively engaged in projects which embody the values of tikkun olam (repairing the world). Each recipient is awarded $36,000 for their college education or to further their work to make our world a better place.

Nominations must be submitted by January 6, 2012.*

Help us celebrate the power of teens to change the world by honoring a special teen you know or encouraging a self-nomination. Watch the video below to learn more.

*Nominations submitted before December 31, 2011 will be entered into a drawing to win a $360 donation to a nonprofit of the nominator’s choice.

AWARD ELIGIBILITY: The award is open to Jewish teens who are residents of California and are ages 13-19 at the time of nomination. Teens’ projects can help either the Jewish community or the general community, so long as they have not been remunerated for their services. Teens may be nominated by any community member who knows the value of their project—except family members—or may also nominate themselves. For more information visit our website or contact the Project Coordinator for the Diller Teen Tikkun Olam Awards, Rachel Bloom, at (415) 512-6437 or rachelb@sfjcf.org.

The Diller Teen Tikkun Olam Awards are generously funded by the Helen Diller Family Foundation

Teen volunteers are fighting poverty

Picture only rubble where your house once stood, before it was wrecked by an earthquake. Imagine showing up to the first day of school, excited about one of your new classes but unable to take notes because your family couldn’t afford school supplies. POVERTY has a devastating impact, and teens are on the forefront of working to secure a sustainable future for peers in their own communities and around the world.

If you know any exceptional Jewish teen volunteers in California who are working to solve social problems like poverty, nominate them to win $36,000 that will change their lives and help them expand their work.

2011 Recipient Daniel Sobajian distributing school supplies

2011 Recipient Daniel Sobajian distributing school supplies

Daniel Sobajian (pictured above) won a 2011 Tikkun Olam Award for his school supply project. Upon transferring to public school, Daniel learned that a shocking number of his classmates lived below the poverty line and were unable to afford essential school supplies. He was moved to support his peers and ensure a good education was within their reach. Daniel has held over 20 supply drives all over Los Angeles and delivered the materials to over 1,000 students.

Ensuring equal opportunities for their peers is important to teens, and almost one in five of the Diller Teen Tikkun Olam Award nominees last year worked on projects combating poverty. Other outstanding teens recognized with a nomination last year organized projects such as raising money to support Haitian school children with supplies after the devastating 2010 earthquake, developing youth chapters of established organizations to engage other teens in fighting poverty, and raising funds to enable regular donations to a local food pantry.

Nominations are now open for the 2012 Diller Teen Tikkun Olam Awards. We are calling on you to help us celebrate the power of teens to change the world. Nominations may be submitted through January 6, 2012.

AWARD ELIGIBILITY: The award is open to Jewish teens who are residents of California and are ages 13-19 at the time of nomination. Teens’ projects can help either the Jewish community or the general community, so long as they have not been remunerated for their services. Teens may be nominated by any community member who knows the value of their project—EXCEPT family members—or may also nominate themselves. For more information visit our website or contact the Project Coordinator for the Diller Teen Tikkun Olam Awards, Rachel Bloom, at (415) 512-6437 or dillerteenaward@sfjcf.org.

Teen Volunteers Tackle Education

EDUCATION issues range from bullying to literacy shortfalls to struggles for already cash-strapped institutions to find additional budget cuts. While adults are striving to address these problems, students are also stepping up, determined to help those in need of a better education locally and abroad. If you know any exceptional Jewish teen volunteers in CA, nominate them to win $36,000 that will change their lives and spotlight their extraordinary work!

2011 Recipient Casey Robbins with textbooks bound for Liberia

2011 Recipient Casey Robbins with textbooks bound for Liberia

Casey Robbins (pictured above) received a 2011 Tikkun Olam Award for her work in securing and donating more than 10,000 textbooks to Liberian schools. After hearing on the radio about the lasting devastation caused by the country’s decade-long civil war, Casey contacted Liberia’s Deputy Minister of Information to find out how she could help. She quickly learned that their education system was in dire straits; Casey made it her mission to send unused textbooks from her school district directly to Liberia. Today she has been able to ship thousands of books in four large shipments – a not-so-easy task she nailed down through research and perseverance.

Education is a way that teens feel they can have a big impact, and almost one in three of the Diller Teen Tikkun Olam Award nominees last year worked on projects impacting the world of learning. Other incredible teens recognized with a nomination last year spearheaded projects such as coordinating bilingual and English-language tutoring, providing students with computers and computer literacy training, and organizing cause-oriented school clubs.

Nominations are now open for the 2012 Diller Teen Tikkun Olam Awards. We are calling on you to help us celebrate the power of teens to change the world. Nominations may be submitted through January 6, 2012.

AWARD ELIGIBILITY:
The award is open to Jewish teens who are residents of California and are ages 13-19 at the time of nomination. Teens’ projects can help either the Jewish community or the general community, so long as they have not been remunerated for their services. Teens may be nominated by any community member who knows the value of their project—EXCEPT family members—or may also nominate themselves. For more information visit our website or contact the Project Coordinator for the Diller Teen Tikkun Olam Awards, Rachel Bloom, at 415.512.6437 or dillerteenaward@sfjcf.org.

Teen Volunteers Making a Big Difference in Health

HEALTH CARE is one of the most important challenges we face today, and local and international organizations from the International Red Cross to UCSF Medicine are working tirelessly to improve our world’s health. Teens are also working with incredible dedication to address health issues in this country and beyond, and we are proud to celebrate their efforts. If you know any exceptional Jewish teen volunteers in CA, nominate them to win $36,000 that will change their lives and spotlight their extraordinary work!

2008 Recipient Fred Scarf and his best friend Shiri

2008 Recipient Fred Scarf and his best friend Shiri

Fred Scarf, above, received a Tikkun Olam Award in 2008 for his project organizing proms for teens with life threatening diseases—who might not make it to their own proms. Fred’s organization, No Worries Now, is still going strong and is working on its 6th prom. The organization is also expanding, pairing teen volunteers with individual patients for monthly outings, creating the tools and resources for other teens to throw proms, and working with Cal Cord Blood to promote life-saving public umbilical cord blood banking.

Last year, almost 20 percent of the Diller Teen Tikkun Olam Award nominees worked on projects impacting disease prevention and care for the sick! Outstanding teens recognized with a nomination last year organized projects such as donating teddy bears and dvds to pediatric wards, raising the money to buy dozens of pediatric wheelchairs for Iraqi children, and organizing a school health fair to teach peers about heart health.

Nominations are now open for the 2012 Diller Teen Tikkun Olam Awards. We are calling on you to help us celebrate the power of teens to change the world. Nominations may be submitted through January 6, 2012.

AWARD ELIGIBILITY: The award is open to Jewish teens who are residents of California and are ages 13-19 at the time of nomination. Teens’ projects can help either the Jewish community or the general community, so long as they have not been remunerated for their services. Teens may be nominated by any community member who knows the value of their project—EXCEPT family members—or may also nominate themselves. For more information visit our website or contact the Project Coordinator for the Diller Teen Tikkun Olam Awards, Rachel Bloom, at (415) 512-6437 or dillerteenaward@sfjcf.org.

Nominations are open for the 6th annual Diller Teen Tikkun Olam Awards

Do you know any Jewish teens dedicated to making the world a better place? If so, nominate them to win a $36,000 award that will change their lives and spotlight their incredible work!

Over the past five years, the Diller Teen Tikkun Olam Awards have celebrated 25 community service leaders from across California for their outstanding volunteer leadership on causes including education, the environment, supporting and engaging their peers and helping refugees of genocide.

IN THEIR OWN WORDS:
Watch past recipients talk about what the Award has meant to them.

Nominations are now open for the 2012 Diller Teen Tikkun Olam Awards. We are calling on you to help us celebrate the power of teens to change the world. Nominations may be submitted through January 6, 2012.

AWARD ELIGIBILITY: The award is open to Jewish teens who are residents of California and are ages 13-19 at the time of nomination. Teens’ projects can help either the Jewish community or the general community, so long as they have not been remunerated for their services. Teens may be nominated by any community member who knows the value of their project—EXCEPT family members—or may also nominate themselves.For more information visit our website or contact the Project Coordinator for the Diller Teen Tikkun Olam Awards, Rachel Bloom, at (415) 512-6437 or dillerteenaward@sfjcf.org.

“A life-changing, incredible, unbelievable three weeks”

A few weeks after returning from the three-week Israel Summer Seminar, Diller Teen Fellows are still processing all of the amazing experiences they had over the summer. Two San Francisco teens in particular – Ilana Crankshaw and Arielle Berman -took to the blogosphere to reflect on how the trip changed their lives.

Ilana Crankshaw volunteering at a resource center for at-risk teens in Kiryat Shmoneh, Israel.

Reflections on Israel
Ilana Crankshaw, August 18, 2011

“All the conversations and feedback had such an impact on me. It has truly changed me as a person. The experience taught me so much about who I am as a person and who I have the potential to be. From the visit to an orthodox synagogue in Jerusalem or the discussion of the relevance of the Covenant in our lives today at congress, I questioned my Jewish identity in ways that changed and strengthened my beliefs and practices…

“Thousands of teenagers participate in Jewish programs and trips to Israel every year. But not everyone gets to lead and participate in intense discussions about the American belief of capitalism verses the Kibbutz belief of socialism. To explore the role the army plays in the lives of Israelis and Americans. Not everyone gets to hear first-hand accounts of what it’s like to lose a sibling or child in the army. Not everyone gets the experience of spending a week being hosted by an Israeli teenager, including having Shabbat dinner with all 25 of her relatives. Not everyone gets to spend their summer with 39 amazing teenagers and form friendships that last a lifetime.

But I was lucky enough to have this experience. For this I am forever thankful.”

Micah Fenner (L) and Arielle Berman (R) volunteering to clean up a bomb shelter in Kiryat Shmoneh, Israel.

The Final Hoorah
Arielle Berman, August 18, 2011

“Being asked to share my final thoughts on the Israel Summer Seminar, all I can say is this: I am beyond grateful. Not only did the Israel Summer Seminar, or ISS for short, inspire and influence me to be a better leader and citizen of the world, but it also allowed us to form friendships and relationships that I would have never imagined possible…

“It’s strange to think that the 20 of us from San Francisco are now either fully embarked or soon to embark on our journey into our final year of high school. In a few months, we’ll be done with applications and we’ll know where we’re off to for the next few years. The 19 of the Upper Galilee kids, however, won’t know what college they’re going to or what field they will be majoring in; they’ll know what field of the army they’ll be going into. They’ll be those men and women in the green uniforms that tourists always ask to take pictures with! And while we think about the danger and intensity of the army and they think about how odd it is that we’re in school for so long, in the back of our minds, I am confident that we’ll still all be thinking about each other and the absolutely life-changing, incredible, unbelievable three weeks that we got to spend together.”

See more pictures of the 2011 Israel Summer Seminar.


The Diller Teen Initiatives are funded by the Helen Diller Family Foundation, a supporting foundation of the Jewish Community Federation and Endowment Fund.


What a difference a day can make

By Ariella Leaffer

On Sunday morning, July 17, 100 Jewish young adults came together for the first ever Day of Volunteering (DOVsf), rolling up their sleeves to make San Francisco more beautiful than ever. 

We spent the morning repainting Christopher Playground with the Neighborhood Parks Council, serving food at St. Vincent de Paul and St. Anthony’s, restoring the natural habitat of the Presidio with the Golden Gate Parks Conservancy, and participating in the AIDS Walk. After working hard, getting sweaty, and having fun, we all met up for lunch at Jillian’s Billiards Club and enjoyed some well-earned relaxation.

Here’s what some of the volunteers have to say:

“I signed up for DOV because I like volunteering but don’t always put the effort into finding opportunities. I also liked that all the young adult groups that I participate in were coming together for one big day!”

“I really enjoyed our activity [painting the playground] because I felt like we were doing something productive and it was fun because we were able to talk to each other while we were doing it. The park staff was very appreciative and made us understand the importance of the work.”

“The group of volunteers in the Presidio spent the day removing non-native and invasive plants from the area…[which] required use of shovels and pick axes – definitely sweat breaking work! There were many new faces and people got to know each other through hard/dirty work.”

DOVsf was a partnership between the Young Adult Division of the Jewish Community Federation, Birthright Israel NEXT, and Temple Emanu-el’s Young Adult Community (YAC). We plan on doing this again next year so stay tuned!

In the meantime, we hope you enjoy some pictures from the day:

Giving the gift of solar energy

The Get Fed program of the JCF brought together 25 eager participants over two days to give the gift of light this Hanukkah—sun power in this case—as we solarized the home of a low-income family in San Francisco. GET SOLAR, this service learning project, was the brainchild of Get Fed committee member Jonathan Axelrad and is the beginning of the Federation’s participation in the modern day energy challenge.

The 25 people included venture capitalists in the green tech arena, several professionals in the solar industry, and Get Fed volunteers among others. The journey began on November 30, when Grid Alternatives, the organization that enables groups like ours to install solar paneling, presented to the group the Whys and Hows of their work.

Get Solar Service Learning Project

Axelrad and Get Fed staff person David Katznelson explained why this modern day energy challenge is a Jewish concern—since by addressing the issue, we are healing the world—and how the bigger goal is to solarize the Federation building and in turn providing a blueprint for solarizing the Jewish Community.

The first cohort showed up on Rhode Island Street behind the general hospital on a rainy Sunday to start the process. The wetness kept the roof work to a minimum, but all of the customized metalwork was attended to and the solar panels, which became the undisputed stars of the show, were set up and prepped for installation.

Get Solar Service Learning Project

The day was eventually called for rain, leaving a day-and-a-half’s amount of work to the next crew who arrived on Monday morning at 8:30.  Monday turned into a beautiful day, and the hours were spent installing a framework for the panels, which included tarring foundation modules to a rook and re-cutting metal.  As the sun went down, and the crisp wind blew against the faces of the workers, the solar panels were handed up to the folks on the roof and the installation was complete.

A big thank you goes out to Jonas, the team captain, Maura and Zack from Grid Alternatives, the Federation’s own Briana Goldman and Emma Meyerson, and our host committee Josh Joseph, Jonathan Axelrad and Lara Ettenson.

The GET SOLAR service learning project was made possible by a generous and heart-felt grant from the Sarlo Foundation.

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